Tag Archives: Collectibles

Henry, Animated!

Yet another Ed-U-Card game with flip animation on the back. This one, called Easy 3’s, features an eclectic assortment of characters from the King Features Syndicate stable. It has characters from Thimble Theatre, but not Popeye. It has Dagwood, but not Blondie. And the animation stars that peculiar mutant kid, Henry. When I was a kid I thought Henry and Popeye were related because they had similar chins and were similarly homely.

The game itself enjoins players to collect three fragments of each character to form a whole. The instructions call it “A new game of educational fun for children. Helps train powers of observation and relationship needed in developing reading skills.”

I hope you enjoy the show!

Popeye Card Game!

I went looking for one thing; found this instead!

Yesterday while rummaging in the basement I uncovered a box of keepsakes I had all but forgotten. Among the items in the box were several decks of card games I and my siblings (as kids) used to entertain ourselves during visits to our grandparents.

This Popeye Card Game is one of several we played that were manufactured by Ed-U-Cards Mfg. Corp L.I.C. of New York. The instructions to this game states that the rules are similar to “Rummy.” The attraction for me, however, was the flip-card animation that was a part of many of these Ed-U-Card games, as you can see in the video.

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Wayne Boring Pencils!

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Here’s another item that was buried sufficiently deep in a closet that it survived the house disaster… and a great photostatic keepsake it is. It’s the splash page and additional art from a Superman story I wrote — and for fans of the classic era of Superman, there’s no mistaking the drawing style. The artist is Wayne Boring.

Wayne’s history with Superman runs deep. He was hired as a ghost artist for the Siegel and Shuster (Superman’s creators) studio in the mid-1930’s, and eventually became the main, credited artist for the Superman newspaper comic strip. When Siegel and Shuster split from their comic book publisher, Boring was hired by that publisher as a staff artist and became one of the main artists for the Superman comic book line for decades thereafter. His style couldn’t have been more distinctive; his Superman figures were the ones who looked like they were jogging across the sky rather than flying.

Wayne Boring had long-since retired when I began writing Superman stories for Editor Julius Schwartz in the mid-1980’s.

Around that time,I was invited to stop in and give a talk at my alma mater, The Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art in Dover, New Jersey. I had attended the school in its earliest days and we alumni were frequently invited to give a progress report whenever we were in town.

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Queen City Comicon 4/16/16!

photo-137One week from today, please come out and see me at the inaugural Queen City Comicon in downtown Cincinnati!

This one-day show is hosted by the same team who does Cincinnati Comic Expo, so I’m anticipating that it will quickly be known as the next great must-go-to Cincinnati show.

I’ll be meeting and greeting, signing, doing commissions and caricatures, selling art, all the usual fun stuff. Admission is a mere five bucks, so you have no excuses for not being there! Click the link!