Category Archives: From The Wreckage

Happy Birthday Jim Broughton!

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While continuing to sort through boxes that were packed away after the house flood, I discovered this page from the Dayton Daily News, August 16, 2004, announcing the opening of Comics and Games Emporium — How I got it or why I saved it, I can’t guess, unless it was just my custom at the time to file away articles about any area comic book activity that I stumbled across.
The gentleman in the picture, the owner of the Dayton comics shop, is Jim Broughton, whom I wouldn’t properly meet until a decade later. Jim and I became friends at the bi-monthly ASH Comics and Toy Shows in Indianapolis a few years ago, and until I ran across this newspaper clipping, I never connected him to the comics shop in the story.
I also never did get to Comics and Games Emporium — and apparently I missed my chance — but Jim Broughton, with Dan Taylor, now operate a great store, Jim & Dan’s Comics & Collectibles in West Alexandria, OH, and also host a quarterly comics convention at Wright State University which I enjoy and recommend (the most recent one was this past Sunday!).
Today is also Jim’s birthday, and I wish him a happy one and many more!

The Elevenaire!

I’m continuing to sift through boxes of stuff that was salvaged from my house flood, and the item that surfaced today coincidentally ties in to my weekend’s television viewing.img_6231The Decades TV network fills each weekend with a marathon of a different vintage television series. This time around, the selection was The Millionaire, an anthology series that ran on CBS from 1955 to 1960. The premise of the show was that an unseen multi-billionaire called John Beresford Tipton (voiced by animation actor Paul Frees), each week tasked his executive secretary, Michael Anthony (played by  Marvin Miller), with delivering a $1,000,000 cashiers check to a random person of Tipton’s selection as a gift. The remainder of the half-hour dramatized how these people from all walks of life were impacted by their unexpected windfall.

I parodied this series in my work for Archie Comics through a character I called The Elevenaire. The late great Stan Goldberg brought The Elevenaire’s visuals to life, and Stan was kind enough to send me copies of his pencils for the inaugural story of this occasional series. Those photocopies turned up in a box stored in my basement today, so I thought I’d share some samples.

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Continue reading The Elevenaire!

Wayne Boring Pencils!

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Here’s another item that was buried sufficiently deep in a closet that it survived the house disaster… and a great photostatic keepsake it is. It’s the splash page and additional art from a Superman story I wrote — and for fans of the classic era of Superman, there’s no mistaking the drawing style. The artist is Wayne Boring.

Wayne’s history with Superman runs deep. He was hired as a ghost artist for the Siegel and Shuster (Superman’s creators) studio in the mid-1930’s, and eventually became the main, credited artist for the Superman newspaper comic strip. When Siegel and Shuster split from their comic book publisher, Boring was hired by that publisher as a staff artist and became one of the main artists for the Superman comic book line for decades thereafter. His style couldn’t have been more distinctive; his Superman figures were the ones who looked like they were jogging across the sky rather than flying.

Wayne Boring had long-since retired when I began writing Superman stories for Editor Julius Schwartz in the mid-1980’s.

Around that time,I was invited to stop in and give a talk at my alma mater, The Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art in Dover, New Jersey. I had attended the school in its earliest days and we alumni were frequently invited to give a progress report whenever we were in town.

Continue reading Wayne Boring Pencils!

Howard the Duck Campaign Button

FullSizeRender-13I’m still sorting through boxes of stuff from my house which flooded a while back, and every so often I discover an item that 1) survived the disaster, and 2) I’d pretty much forgotten ever existed. The process has been like a very soggy Christmas; I keep finding soggy presents amongst the soggy lumps of coal. So I decided to post some of these forgotten treasures as the mood strikes.

You didn’t know Howard the Duck ran for president? Here’s a campaign button that Marvel issued during the ’76 race, featuring Howard and his slogan “Get Down America!’ He didn’t win but perhaps he can be drafted this time around.

This image of Howard was drawn by the great Berni Wrightson, best known for his co-creation, Swamp Thing. Actually, Berni is better known for his intricate and controlled, dollar-bill-engraving-quality linework and his shadow-drenched atmospheric compositions.

Howard the Duck was created by writer Steve Gerber and artist Val Mayerik. He was an incidental character in Adventure Into Fear #19 (1973), caught the attention of readers, and was spun off into his own title (1976). And, there was a movie.

Incidentally, Frank Brunner, the artist who drew the first issue of Marvel’s Howard the Duck comic, will be the featured guest at this weekend’s Queen City Comicon. I’ve never met Frank (who also drew some of the more memorable issues of Doctor Strange), so here’s my chance! (And yours!)

 

Finished With Plumbers

A year and seven months after my water disaster, the plumbers are at the house doing the last of their work, knock on wood. They tell me that my home is legendary in their circles, and a topic of frequent discussion at the restoration company. This morning, they snapped the head of a monkey wrench off attempting to open a stubborn galvanized clean-out pipe, so there are still surprises, but hopefully not too many more.

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The ‘Barrel Of Tears’ above was created by, and a gift from, comic creator Justin Green. It’s shown here sitting on my ice-covered kitchen windowsill, last February.